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Cervical Disc Herniation

What Cervical Disc Herniation?

Cervical Disc Herniation is a common cause of neck and upper body pain. Pain may feel dull or sharp in the neck, between the shoulder blades, and may radiate (travel) downward into the arms, hands and fingers. Sensations of numbness and tingling are typical symptoms, and some patients report muscle spasms. Certain positions and movement can aggravate and intensify pain. In some patients, a cervical herniated disc can cause spinal cord compression where disc material pushes on the spinal cord. This is a much more serious condition and may require a more aggressive treatment plan.

Stages of a Cervical Herniated Disc

The 4 stages to a cervical herniated disc are:

  • Disc Degeneration: Chemical changes associated with aging cause intervertebral discs to weaken, but without a herniation. This is part of the aging process discussed above, and it can cause the disc to dry out, making it less able to absorb the shock from your movements. It can also become thinner in this stage.

  • Prolapse: The form or position of the disc changes with some slight impingement into the spinal canal or spinal nerves. This stage is also called a bulging disc or protruding disc.

  • Extrusion: The gel-like nucleus pulposus (inner part of the intervertebral disc) breaks through the tire-like wall (annulus fibrosis) but remains within the disc.

  • Sequestration or Sequestered Disc: The nucleus pulposus breaks through the annulus fibrosis and can move outside the intervertebral disc and into the spinal canal.